these are the timesdirty beloved
-

Why?

1.2.03

http://www.albumenworks.com/millercollection.html
http://www.hpmix.com/home/mogeiko/CI7.htm
http://www.history.uiuc.edu/hoxie/Images/peyote/peyote.htm
http://www.fujirabbit.com/frame_intro.html

http://www.marcelduchamp.org/index.html

31.1.03

As a youth I was obsessed with graves.
There are six-hundred and eighty-nine
mounds in Hwandung Cemetery.

At Sarabong graveyard on Cheju Island
I would stop on the way every night

To sleep by the grave side.
Word spread that I was a ghost
residing in that cemetery....

from Memory of the Graves
by Ko Un

in the online version of the spring issue of Jubilat in which there is also a snippet from an interview with Jimmie Dale Gilmore in which he says this:
'Then I came across the passage by Ezra Pound, and I think I have this quote accurate. He said, "The poem fails when it strays too far from the song, and the song fails when it strays too far from the dance."'



I went down with Mr Lowes & Robin to see them trying to catch trout - in a lovely little river at Glen Falloch - we had tea when we returned, about 5pm to find lots of visitors - they're awfully sweet people & the table laden with wonderful eats - how they live these folk - they have pots of cash & yet are as natural about things as tho they hadn't anything, they just accept things - they are not one scrap blatant one would call them the real thing I s'pose - charming types, so few & far between nowadays. Anyway we loved every second & imagine my intense excitement when the lads - everyone dresses at night for dinner, of course - all came down in kilts - believe me there is nothing on earth more glamorous than full dress tartan, as is worn in the evenings - I was completely swept off my feet when the 2 Gordon boys came in in their dress tartans - I was speechless until halfway thro' dinner & didn't even notice I was eating grouse

letters home from an Australian nurse in Britain, 1937-1944

lots of Jesus

Roy de Carava photographs

John Trudell's still working

There's an innocence, a childlike aspect to the art. I like that. I'm not complaining, but there's pressure to the comedy, to keeping up a level of standards. There's none of that when I'm painting. It's like a little kid, just magically creating. Once it went out, if you took it seriously, something in me would be concerned about how people would react, and that takes away from the childishness of it.

Steven Wright interview at the Onion

30.1.03

Crayons! bigtime! corporate logo energy leech advisory

29.1.03

http://www.piranha.de/records/english/download/download.htm

http://amadouetmariam.calabashmusic.com/

Many Madonnas. Many. Very very many. a multitude of Madonnas. it's Jungian. it's a fragment of the sacred. I neither worship nor deny.

Peter Nahum at The Leicester Galleries
romantic, pre-Raphaelite, serious fantasy imagery

27.1.03

Mimi Smith

Steel Wool Peignoir, 1966
Steel wool, nylon, lace

Edward Robert Hughes was the nephew of Arthur Hughes. It's my impression that you can love Borges, or you can love the Pre-Raphaelites, but you can't love them both. I like Borges. Some of his work. I like Edward Robert Hughes. Some of his work.

Art Magick proceeds apace.

"Here, Mother, in the red cow's mouth."

http://www.nmgm.org.uk/walker/brief_enc/index.html

http://www.nmgm.org.uk/walker/picofmonth/archiveframeset.html

more images of Patti Smith

than you can shake a stick at.

26.1.03

Kroyer Summer

Hammershoi The British Museum

these works are not in the Met's own collection, and so can't be saved into the My Met Gallery application.


Three Dancers Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas
.

Dust Motes Dancing in the Sunlight, Interior of the Artist's Home Vilhelm Hammershoi

Flowers and fruits Henri Matisse

Basque (Northern Spain and South West France)-anchovy (dried fish), bizarre (beard), jingo (god - used in jingoism)
Choctaw (North America)-
Alabama (US state - I clear the land), Oklahoma (US state - red people)

Caterina-&-Open Brackets-&-Language Hat
each of whom then points to this as being more etymologically accurate.

I love yiddish because it is a language centered on the human condition. It has an incredible of collection of curses, praises, and characterizations. It is an onomatopoetic language--if I call you a schmuck, you would know I was being offensive even if you had never heard of yiddish. It laughs at wealth. It skewers arrogance. It deflates pomposity.

Most of all, it's a survivor's language. It has survived disdain and neglect, pogroms and concentration camps, with laughter and tears, and mostly, defiance.

late night thoughts

should put wood's lot in this links list too.
Meiji albumen prints, old Japan photographs

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